Phoenix Pediatrics

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Practice is Perfect

National Bank of Arizona helps doctors with financial needs

By Debra Gelbart

Gerald Golner, M.D. established Phoenix Pediatrics in 1974; for the past 15 years, his son, Bradley Golner, M.D., has been a partner in the practice, too. But they don’t work together on most days. They care for patients at separate locations. “It’s nice to be able to consult with each other, though,” Gerald Golner said. They share the practice with four other pediatricians who also are partners. Phoenix Pediatrics has two locations—in central and north Phoenix. Gerald work at the central office and Brad works at the north office. The practice banks with National Bank of Arizona because Gerald appreciates “the personal attention provided to us and the bank’s understanding of our financial needs.” “Medical billing and medical receivables are unique,” explained Phoenix Pediatrics’ NB|AZ banker, Michael Hasenkamp. “No other enterprise works the same way. We’ve taken the time to get to know their line of business,” he said. “Through what’s known as a ‘lockbox,’ we provide the practice with a way to efficiently and quickly deposit funds from insurance companies while preserving all of the important documentation that accompanies these receivables.” “National Bank of Arizona makes life much easier for us,” Gerald said. “Without the ‘lockbox’ arrangement, we’d probably have to hire more people to handle deposits.” Since 1980, Phoenix Pediatrics has taken an interest in special-needs children. The practice cares for more of these children than any other private practice in Arizona, yet the majority of the practice’s patients are typical children. “We started providing a ‘medical home’ (where patients and families can be assured that medical and non-medical needs are met) long before the concept was labeled that way,” Gerald said. For some of their special-needs patients, care is provided by the same doctors after the patients grow up. “Some special-needs patients with significant challenges can stay with us into adulthood,” he said.

Practice is Perfect

National Bank of Arizona helps doctors with financial needs

By Debra Gelbart

Gerald Golner, M.D. established Phoenix Pediatrics in 1974; for the past 15 years, his son, Bradley Golner, M.D., has been a partner in the practice, too.

But they don’t work together on most days. They care for patients at separate locations. “It’s nice to be able to consult with each other, though,” Gerald Golner said. They share the practice with four other pediatricians who also are partners.

Phoenix Pediatrics has two locations—in central and north Phoenix. Gerald work at the central office and Brad works at the north office. The practice banks with National Bank of Arizona because Gerald appreciates “the personal attention provided to us and the bank’s understanding of our financial needs.”

“Medical billing and medical receivables are unique,” explained Phoenix Pediatrics’ NB|AZ banker, Michael Hasenkamp. “No other enterprise works the same way. We’ve taken the time to get to know their line of business,” he said. “Through what’s known as a ‘lockbox,’ we provide the practice with a way to efficiently and quickly deposit funds from insurance companies while preserving all of the important documentation that accompanies these receivables.”

“National Bank of Arizona makes life much easier for us,” Gerald said. “Without the ‘lockbox’ arrangement, we’d probably have to hire more people to handle deposits.”

Since 1980, Phoenix Pediatrics has taken an interest in special-needs children. The practice cares for more of these children than any other private practice in Arizona, yet the majority of the practice’s patients are typical children. “We started providing a ‘medical home’ (where patients and families can be assured that medical and non-medical needs are met) long before the concept was labeled that way,” Gerald said.

For some of their special-needs patients, care is provided by the same doctors after the patients grow up. “Some special-needs patients with significant challenges can stay with us into adulthood,” he said.

Practice is Perfect

National Bank of Arizona helps doctors with financial needs

By Debra Gelbart

Gerald Golner, M.D. established Phoenix Pediatrics in 1974; for the past 15 years, his son, Bradley Golner, M.D., has been a partner in the practice, too.

But they don’t work together on most days. They care for patients at separate locations. “It’s nice to be able to consult with each other, though,” Gerald Golner said. They share the practice with four other pediatricians who also are partners.

Phoenix Pediatrics has two locations—in central and north Phoenix. Gerald work at the central office and Brad works at the north office. The practice banks with National Bank of Arizona because Gerald appreciates “the personal attention provided to us and the bank’s understanding of our financial needs.”

“Medical billing and medical receivables are unique,” explained Phoenix Pediatrics’ NB|AZ banker, Michael Hasenkamp. “No other enterprise works the same way. We’ve taken the time to get to know their line of business,” he said. “Through what’s known as a ‘lockbox,’ we provide the practice with a way to efficiently and quickly deposit funds from insurance companies while preserving all of the important documentation that accompanies these receivables.”

“National Bank of Arizona makes life much easier for us,” Gerald said. “Without the ‘lockbox’ arrangement, we’d probably have to hire more people to handle deposits.”

Since 1980, Phoenix Pediatrics has taken an interest in special-needs children. The practice cares for more of these children than any other private practice in Arizona, yet the majority of the practice’s patients are typical children. “We started providing a ‘medical home’ (where patients and families can be assured that medical and non-medical needs are met) long before the concept was labeled that way,” Gerald said.

For some of their special-needs patients, care is provided by the same doctors after the patients grow up. “Some special-needs patients with significant challenges can stay with us into adulthood,” he said.

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