Athletic Institute of Medicine

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Exercising Innovation

Sports medicine physician finds NB|AZ to be like-minded partner

By Debra Gelbart

Orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine specialist Thomas J. Wall, M.D., Ph.D. established the Athletic Institute of Medicine in Scottsdale in 1999 to treat athletes and “weekend warriors.” “I take a holistic approach to sports medicine,” he said, “and incorporate what are called ‘orthobiologics’ into treatment plans. These may include the patient’s platelet-rich plasma, stem cells and cartilage transplants to promote healing.  We also consider the psychological, nutritional and preventive components of sports injuries so that we can help patients more effectively.” Wall’s surgical specialties include knee, hip and shoulder arthroscopic reconstruction. Just as he sees every patient as an individual with unique needs, he appreciates that National Bank of Arizona offers personalized service as his banking partner. “Every employee we have encountered has gone above and beyond to provide excellent service,” he said. “And that makes us more efficient in our work, letting us focus on patient care.” Wall’s wife Sabrina, who is also his business manager, recently transitioned the practice’s business accounts over to NB|AZ from another bank. “NB|AZ made that process very easy,” Wall said. In the mid-1990s, he strategically chose Greater Phoenix as the best location to practice medicine because he wanted to be in a region “where people are involved in athletic activities year-round.” He moved here after graduating from Temple University’s School of Medicine in Philadelphia and completing his residency at Penn State’s Hershey Medical Center. He didn’t want to stay in a place where bad weather forced people to stay indoors. He considers his greatest success to be remaining a solo practitioner. “So many medical school graduates today are joining huge practices because so much has changed in health care,” he said. “I figure if you can stay in practice as a solo practitioner while teaching medical students and residents, you must be doing something right.”

Exercising Innovation

Sports medicine physician finds NB|AZ to be like-minded partner

By Debra Gelbart

Orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine specialist Thomas J. Wall, M.D., Ph.D. established the Athletic Institute of Medicine in Scottsdale in 1999 to treat athletes and “weekend warriors.”

“I take a holistic approach to sports medicine,” he said, “and incorporate what are called ‘orthobiologics’ into treatment plans. These may include the patient’s platelet-rich plasma, stem cells and cartilage transplants to promote healing.  We also consider the psychological, nutritional and preventive components of sports injuries so that we can help patients more effectively.” Wall’s surgical specialties include knee, hip and shoulder arthroscopic reconstruction.

Just as he sees every patient as an individual with unique needs, he appreciates that National Bank of Arizona offers personalized service as his banking partner. “Every employee we have encountered has gone above and beyond to provide excellent service,” he said. “And that makes us more efficient in our work, letting us focus on patient care.”

Wall’s wife Sabrina, who is also his business manager, recently transitioned the practice’s business accounts over to NB|AZ from another bank. “NB|AZ made that process very easy,” Wall said.

In the mid-1990s, he strategically chose Greater Phoenix as the best location to practice medicine because he wanted to be in a region “where people are involved in athletic activities year-round.” He moved here after graduating from Temple University’s School of Medicine in Philadelphia and completing his residency at Penn State’s Hershey Medical Center. He didn’t want to stay in a place where bad weather forced people to stay indoors.

He considers his greatest success to be remaining a solo practitioner. “So many medical school graduates today are joining huge practices because so much has changed in health care,” he said. “I figure if you can stay in practice as a solo practitioner while teaching medical students and residents, you must be doing something right.”

Exercising Innovation

Sports medicine physician finds NB|AZ to be like-minded partner

By Debra Gelbart

Orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine specialist Thomas J. Wall, M.D., Ph.D. established the Athletic Institute of Medicine in Scottsdale in 1999 to treat athletes and “weekend warriors.”

“I take a holistic approach to sports medicine,” he said, “and incorporate what are called ‘orthobiologics’ into treatment plans. These may include the patient’s platelet-rich plasma, stem cells and cartilage transplants to promote healing.  We also consider the psychological, nutritional and preventive components of sports injuries so that we can help patients more effectively.” Wall’s surgical specialties include knee, hip and shoulder arthroscopic reconstruction.

Just as he sees every patient as an individual with unique needs, he appreciates that National Bank of Arizona offers personalized service as his banking partner. “Every employee we have encountered has gone above and beyond to provide excellent service,” he said. “And that makes us more efficient in our work, letting us focus on patient care.”

Wall’s wife Sabrina, who is also his business manager, recently transitioned the practice’s business accounts over to NB|AZ from another bank. “NB|AZ made that process very easy,” Wall said.

In the mid-1990s, he strategically chose Greater Phoenix as the best location to practice medicine because he wanted to be in a region “where people are involved in athletic activities year-round.” He moved here after graduating from Temple University’s School of Medicine in Philadelphia and completing his residency at Penn State’s Hershey Medical Center. He didn’t want to stay in a place where bad weather forced people to stay indoors.

He considers his greatest success to be remaining a solo practitioner. “So many medical school graduates today are joining huge practices because so much has changed in health care,” he said. “I figure if you can stay in practice as a solo practitioner while teaching medical students and residents, you must be doing something right.”

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